Bring Me To Life

Evanescence

Call my name and save me…

Lead singer, Amy Lee, wrote this about the man who would become her husband. When she met him her life was a mess and she says that he looked into her eyes and asked if she was happy. “I felt like he could just see straight into my soul.”
The co-writer of the song said it was about

“discovering something or someone that awakens a feeling inside them that they’ve never had before. You discover there is a world that is bigger than just your safe bubble.”

songfacts.com

The song hardly needs any comment and seems to resonate with the cry of humanity, “save me from the nothing I’ve become”. To me the song is a cry from the heart, a longing to be known, to be really seen. It’s the longing to come alive.

And the story reminded me of a woman Jesus met. He saw through her words and how things appeared externally. He offered her life. She described him as someone who “told me everything I have ever done”, maybe she felt like Amy Lee, “he could see straight into my soul.”

Read and reflect… John chapter 4:3-29.

“Bring me to life…wake me up inside”

Anthem

Leonard Cohen

Ring the bells that still can ring

For a fairly introspective 17 year old the music of Leonard Cohen (1934-2016) drew me with a fascination bordering on obsession; I can still remember sitting alone in my bedroom listening to ‘Bird on a Wire’ on repeat. The phase soon passed, and I only recently came to appreciate the depths of this song ‘Anthem’, from Cohen’s 1992 album ‘The Future’. 

‘The Future’ contains references to traumatic historical events, including Hiroshima and the Second World War. The massacre of students in Tiananmen Square and the fall of the Berlin wall both happened in 1989; it was a time of massive upheaval and uncertainty in the world. 

Listening again in late 2019 you have to ask, has much has changed? Just thinking about our own country (quite apart from the rest of the world!) Britain is facing a bewildering parliamentary election, Brexit is unresolved, the country has more Foodbanks than McDonalds….. there surely still is ‘a crack, a crack, in everything’, but Cohen leaves us with a note of hope, ‘that’s how the light gets in’. We need the light, in our national and our personal lives, as never before. 

Currently it is Advent, traditionally the time for preparing for the coming of Christ. For me this song provides a kind of transcendence, bringing hope into the apparent hopelessness of our world. The parallels are obvious I hope. 

© Dorne Watson

The true light that shines on everyone was coming into the world. The Word was in the world, but no one knew him, though God had made the world with his Word.

John 1.9-10

Wish You Were Here

Dave Gilmour

“did you exchange a walk-on part in the war
for a lead role in a cage?”

In the YouTube discussions on this song someone has said “If God had a ringtone, it would be this”.

Sung here by Dave Gilmour, the lyrics were written mainly by Roger Waters and made famous originally by Pink Floyd with their album of the same name. This performance is from the Meltdown Festival at the Royal Festival Hall, London in 2001.

I heard this song recently at a pub open mic night and it reminded me of how powerful and emotionally relevant it is for so many people. And it shows how a strong song can be performed successfully with minimal accompaniment, which is why I chose an ‘unplugged’ version to share.

The main theme is lament – an expression of grief for a lost person, a lost relationship or maybe a lost future, if only life had taken a different turn.

I find the words “did you exchange a walk-on part in the war
for a lead role in a cage?” a personal challenge, as I try to live a worthwhile life, and think about whether I take enough risks – or in religious language, whether I have enough faith.

In the Bible there is a song written by David (of David and Goliath fame) after he hears that his very close friend Jonathan has been killed in battle. 2 Samuel 1:17-27. Wish you were here.