Call Me

Blondie

“Blondie’s Back” Live Concert at The Town Hall 1999, New York City

In the 1970s Blondie had a string of hits and although the publicity made them look like a manufactured pop product, they were in fact a ‘proper’ rock band as you can see here.

This song was a big hit in the 1980s, having been written as the main theme for the film ‘American Gigolo’ in which Richard Gere plays a male prostitute who is framed for murder. ‘Call me’ is being sung from the point of view of his character, clearly an advertisement and invitation to make use of his personal services. I’d like to re-purpose the refrain of the song as a message from God to us all:

Call me on the line
Call me, call me anytime
Call me, oh my love
When you’re ready we can share the wine

These corona virus days are troubled times and this is an invitation to pray. Pray for those suffering the disease and its after-effects, pray for grieving families and friends, pray for stressed and lonely people, poor and frightened people. Pray for God to guide our leaders, pray for the medical staff and all the key workers. Pray that some good will come from this for our society, our economy and our environment. And if you’re reading this in the future when this particular crisis is over, I’m sure there will be something else to pray about – just read the news.

God cares for you, so turn all your worries over to him.

I Peter 5.7

Born To Be Wild

Steppenwolf

A bad trip?

We’re all feeling a bit cooped-up at the moment, with the Covid-19 lockdown in place, so time to get out on the open road with this riff rock classic, credited with the introduction of the term ‘heavy metal’.

I’m focusing on the song, really, but the context in the video is the 1969 film ‘Easy Rider’. In it, the characters are escaping with the proceeds of a drug smuggling enterprise. Just a bit of a spoiler – it doesn’t end well. So despite its countercultural portrayal of sex, drugs and er… some other drugs, the film is a kind of morality tale.

The song wasn’t written for the film however and I’m interested in the way it speaks to me about life and how to live it. The 60s were a time when people were trying to find new ways of living and ‘head out on the highway’ is obviously a metaphor for that. I’m involved with Christian friends who are trying to pioneer new ways of following Jesus and so the message of the song is relevant to that calling.

Get your motor runnin’

Head out on the highway

Lookin’ for adventure

And whatever comes our way

Yeah Darlin’ go make it happen

Take the world in a love embrace

AZ Lyrics

Among many religions, there is tradition of journey as a picture of life and that is the meaning behind the act of pilgrimage – deliberately going somewhere with other people for a spiritual purpose. The destination is not really the point of it, so much as the travelling together and the adventures on the way.

“I like smoke and lightning, heavy metal thunder”. If that’s for you, I hope you enjoy this Bible reading about the prophet Elijah.

Here’s your homework!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Born_to_Be_Wild
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easy_Rider

Boys Don’t Cry

The Cure

Don’t they look so young in this video ? Oh, wait a minute …

Boys don’t cry? Sung ironically, of course, because, yes boys DO cry. This one does, anyway. So here is a song with an almost timeless message of lost romance and yearning “I would do ‘most anything to get you back by my side”- followed by the stoic response that has traditionally been expected of men , at least in the England of 1979: “I try to laugh about it, hiding the tears in my eyes.”

Slight aside – it’s worth mentioning the award-winning 1999 film ‘Boys Don’t Cry’, which makes use of this song. It dramatises the real-life story of a trans-man in America who was looking for love but was brutally raped and murdered.

There are only a few primary human emotions: happiness, sadness, fear, disgust, anger and surprise. Four out of six are ‘negative’ – too bad – your fault for being a human! Some lists add other emotions such as shame and pride. Part of being human and being alive is feeling and expressing emotions. We write love letters, sing songs, tweet in anger, shout in the streets. Our faces usually show our emotions and sometimes our bodies just give the game away for us, and then we cry.

So crying in the Bible? Actually there’s plenty of it, all over. But there is an account of Jesus crying – not because of some cosmic disaster or over the plight of humankind. He cried because his friend had died. So you can cry too, if you want to.